• NEW LAWS FOR 2015

    The following is a quick summary of the most significant changes in the law impacting California businesses.

    Paid Sick Leave for All California Employees – Effective July 15, 2015, employers doing business in California must provide paid sick days to almost all employees. Full-time and part-time employees will accrue 1 hours of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked. California’s paid sick leave begins accruing as soon as the employee starts to work , although an employer can prohibit an employee from using accrued paid sick leave in the first 90 days of employment. Employers may “limit an employee’s use of paid sick days to 24 hours or three days in each year of employment.” Unused paid sick days carry over to the following year, but employers can place a 6-day(48-hour) cap on the paid sick day accrual. Some cities have ordinances that allow a higher cap, and employers have to comply with whichever laws are most favorable to employees. Employers must also provide written notice of the accrued and used sick leave, either on the pay stub or in a separate document, with every paycheck.

    City Paid Sick Leave Ordinances –San Francisco, Oakland and San Diego passed city-wide ordinances requiring paid sick leave for certain employees. The city ordinances are similar to California’s new paid sick leave law, but typically provide additional benefits for employees working within city limits.

    Federal Regulations Regarding Companions Goes Into Effect – Although the Department of Labor has said it will not enforce the new regulations until mid-year, effective January 1, 2015, companions will be entitled to overtime when they work more than 40 hours in a week, unless otherwise exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act. While some personal attendants may still be exempt if the household owner employs the companion directly and the duties are limited to providing companionship and protection, caregivers employed by third-party employers and caregivers that provide care in addition to companionship and protection are now covered by the FLSA. Although personal attendants in California have been entitled to overtime after 9 hours in a day or 45 hours in a week, Californians using caregivers may need to pay weekly overtime after 40 hours in a week.

    Additional Protections Under the Fair Employment and Housing Act –

    Unpaid Interns Are Protected from Unlawful Harassment – Effective January 1, 2015, the Fair Employment and Housing Act extends protection to unpaid interns. Keep in mind that the Labor Commissioner and the Department of Labor only allow unpaid interns in a few limited situations, typically when the intern is receiving school credit and the employer receives very little benefit from the work. If you use interns, now is a good time to examine whether the interns are actually entitled to wages.

    Anti-Bullying Module for Sexual Harassment Prevention Training – All employers with 50 or more employees are required to provide 2 hours of sexual harassment prevention training to all supervisory employees every 2 years. Although “bullying” is not strictly prohibited by law, AB 2053 now requires the sexual harassment prevention training include a module on anti-bullying.

    No Discrimination Against Workers with Special Drivers Licenses – The DMV must issue an original driver’s license to California residents even if the person cannot lawful residence in the United States.  AB 1660 prohibits discrimination against an individual because he or she holds or presents a driver’s license issued under these provisions, or to require a person to present a driver’s license, except in specific situations. Additionally, FEHA’s definition of “national origin” now includes discrimination on the basis of possessing a driver’s license granted under Section 12801.9 of the Vehicle Code.  The new laws do not alter an employer’s rights or obligations regarding obtaining proof of lawful residency prior to employment. Any action taken by an employer that is required by the federal Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. Sec. 1324a) is not a violation of law. Driver’s license information obtained by an employer must be treated as private and confidential, is exempt from disclosure under the California Public Records Act, and can not be disclosed to any unauthorized person or used for any purpose other than to establish identity and authorization to drive.

    Employers Using Third-Party Employers Are Liable for Wages and Workers’ Compensation Insurance – Labor Code section 2810.3 requires a “client employer” to share with a “labor contractor” all civil legal responsibility and civil liability for all workers supplied by that labor contractor for the payment of wages and the failure to obtain valid workers’ compensation coverage.  In other words, if your company receives workers through a contracting agency, and that agency fails to pay the worker or fails to maintain valid workers’ compensation coverage, your company could be responsible for any unpaid wages or workers’ compensation claims. Employers can still include indemnification language in their contracts, but they cannot avoid liability by hiring the worker through a third-party employer.

    Longer Statute of Limitations for Liquidated Damages and Failure to Timely Pay Final Wages – Existing law provides for criminal and civil penalties for certain wage violations and authorizes the Labor Commissioner to recover liquidated damages for minimum wage violations. AB 1723 expands Labor Code section 1197.1 to allow the Labor Commissioner to issue citations and seek penalties for the willful failure to timely pay wages of a resigned or discharged employee (e.g., waiting time penalties).

    Several Cases Cause Employers to Reconsider Mandatory Arbitration Provisions – For years employers had difficulty requiring employees to agree to resolve all dispute through arbitration. Recent U.S. Supreme Court and California court decisions make it easier for employers to require binding arbitration for some employment law claims. Employers should evaluate whether binding arbitration is the right decision for their business. There are many pros and cons to resolving cases through binding arbitration, and employers must still be careful when drafting arbitration agreements. Just because you find an arbitration agreement on line does not mean it will be enforceable.

    Minimum Wage Increase By Various Cities – Several cities passed their own ordinances requiring a higher minimum wage for employees working within certain geographical limits:

    City Rate Effective
    Berkeley $10.00$11.00 1/1/1510/1/15
    Menlo Park $10.30 7/1/15
    Oakland $12.25 3/2/15
    Richmond $9.60 1/1/15
    San DiegoRepealed/delayed by voter action $9.75 1/1/15
    San Francisco $11.05$12.25 1/1/155/1/15
    San Jose $10.30 1/1/15
    Sunnyvale $10.30 1/1/15

    We expect to see more cities adopt similar legislation, and California legislators are trying to pass a higher California minimum wage by the end of the year (currently slated to increase to $10.00 per hour on January 1, 2016).

    Employers need to update their employment handbooks and their policies to comply with the new laws. There is no better time to review your policies and practices with a knowledgeable employment attorney. The New Year affords employers the opportunity to start the year in compliance, and avoid potentially costly mistakes.

    If you have any questions about the new laws, or any employment-related matter, contact our office and speak with one of our attorneys. Let us help you figure out how to employ your workers correctly, so you can focus on growing your business.

    The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego
    95 South Market Street, Suite 520
    San Jose, CA 95113
    Tel. 408-293-6341
     
    Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman, former associate of The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego.
     
    Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law, but we cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.
     
    Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be posted in this blog and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.Phillip J. Griego represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.

  • New Laws Require Additional Training and Prohibit Harassment of Unpaid Interns

    Governor Brown signed AB 1443 and AB 2053 amending California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act.  AB 1443 expands FEHA’s anti-harassment protection to unpaid interns.  AB 2053 requires employers to add an anti-bullying module to their sexual harassment prevention training.  Employers and employees (and now volunteers) need to be mindful of the new protections and requirements.

    Protection for Unpaid Interns and Volunteers

    Existing law protects employees and applicants from unlawful discrimination and harassment in the workplace on account of race, religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, physical disability, mental disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, sexgender, gender identity, gender expression, age, sexual orientation, or military and veteran status.   AB 1443 expands FEHA’s protections to persons in unpaid internships or other volunteer positions.  The law does not make it lawful to employ unpaid interns, and the Labor Commissioner and the Department of Labor have taken strong positions that make it very difficult to use unpaid interns.  Regardless of whether the intern or volunteer is required to be paid as an employee, effective January 1, 2015, employers and employees may not discriminate or harass unpaid interns and volunteers in violation of FEHA.

    Employers should communicate to its employees that unpaid interns and volunteers are afforded the same rights to a harassment-free workplace as other employees.

    Anti-Bullying Training

    Employers with 50 or more employees are required to provide sexual harassment prevention training to supervisory employees every two years.  AB 2053 requires the training include a module regarding “prevention of abusive conduct.”  The law does not actually prohibit abusive conduct, unless such conduct otherwise violates FEHA, but it does require employers to train supervisory employees regarding conduct “that a reasonable person would find hostile, offensive, and unrelated to an employer’s legitimate business interests.”

    AB 2053 instructs, “Abusive conduct may include repeated infliction of verbal abuse, such as the use of derogatory remarks, insults, and epithets, verbal or physical conduct that a reasonable person would find threatening, intimidating, or humiliating, or the gratuitous sabotage or undermining of a person’s work performance. A single act shall not constitute abusive conduct, unless especially severe and egregious.”

    While abusive conduct unrelated to a protected category may not be illegal (yet), an employer could theoretically be cited for failing to train supervisors regarding such abusive conduct.  There is no indication that an employee could sue an employer for a failure to provide the requisite training, but the failure to provide the training, or a violation of a company’s anti-bullying policy, may certainly be evidence of a hostile work environment in the right case.

    Employers should ensure their next sexual harassment prevention training includes an anti-bullying module.  Employers may also want to consider updating their handbooks to ensure they have a policy prohibiting “abusive conduct.”

    The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego
    95 South Market Street, Suite 520
    San Jose, CA 95113
    Tel. 408-293-6341
     
    Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman, former associate of The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego.
     
    Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law, but we cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.
     
    Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be posted in this blog and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.Phillip J. Griego represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.

  • California Employee Constructively Discharged When Employer Refused to Reimburse Mileage Expenses

    California’s Second Appellate District reversed a judgment in favor of Franklin Management Real Estate Fund, Inc. concluding that an employee could state a cause of action for wrongful constructive discharge when an employer refuses to reimburse a low-wage earner for mileage expenses.

    Jorge Vasquez worked as a maintenance technician, earning $10.00 per hour.  His job required him to travel to various locations including the hardware store.  According to Vasquez, he drove about 30 miles a day incurring over $300.00 per day in fuel and maintenance costs.  When Franklin Management Real Estate Fund refused to reimburse Vasquez for the mileage expenses he quit and sued his employer for constructive discharge in violation of public policy.

    The trial court originally dismissed the complaint after concluding that an employer’s failure to pay mileage expenses of $15 per day was not conduct “so intolerable or aggravated that a reasonable person in the employee’s position would have felt no choice but to resign.”  On appeal, Vasquez argued that the employer, in effect, required Vasquez to use his own wages to pay for the employer’s costs of doing business.  Since Vasquez only earned $10.00 per hour, the mileage expenses allegedly represented a significant portion of his take-home pay.

    The appellate court found that under Turner v. Anheuser-Busch, Inc. (1994) 7 Cal.4th 1238, a jury could find that the employer “knowingly permitted working conditions that were so intolerable or aggravated at the time of the employee’s resignation that a reasonable employer would realize that a reasonable person in the employee’s position would be compelled to resign.”  The court also concluded that California’s minimum wage law represents a fundamental policy for purposes of a claim for wrongful termination or constructive discharge in violation of public policy.

    Although California is an at-will state, employers cannot terminate an employee for engaging in protected conduct.  Employers also cannot force employees to work under intolerable or aggravated working conditions.  When the working conditions become intolerable as a result of an employer’s violations of the law, the employee may be able to establish a wrongful constructive discharge in violation of public policy.
    If you believe you have been wrongfully terminated, or forced to quit due as a result of a violation of law, you should contact an attorney familiar with wrongful termination cases.
    The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego
    95 South Market Street, Suite 520
    San Jose, CA 95113
    Tel. 408-293-6341
     
    Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman, former associate of The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego.
     
    Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law, but we cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.
     
    Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be posted in this blog and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.Phillip J. Griego represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.

  • 3 Things That Can’t Wait Until Next Year

    Well, the California legislature is at it again. Governor Brown signed several laws that change how employers do business in California. Most of the new laws are effective January 1st and require immediate action, so don’t put this off!

    1. Update Your Handbook

    You must now add “gender expression” and “genetic information” to the list of protected characteristics in your EEO and Anti-Harassment policies.

    You must now maintain an employee’s health insurance benefits at the same level of benefit during an employee’s Pregnancy Disability Leave.  Handbooks must be modified to reflect the new requirement.

    2. Revise or Create Offer Letters & Commission Agreements

    All employers must now provide the terms of employment in writing prior to commencing work.  In addition to standard information regarding pay rates, the offer letter must specify overtime rates, the regular paydays, and the contact information for the company’s Workers’ Compensation Carrier.  You will also need to provide written notice when any of the designated items changes.

    12/29/11 UPDATE

    The Labor Commissioner has drafted a template employers should use to comply with new Labor Code Section 2810.5(a).  You can download the template here.

    Beginning January 1, 2013, all employees paid on a commission basis must receive written copies of the commission plan specifying “the method by which commissions shall be computed and paid.” Given the complexity of many commission plans, do not wait until the end of 2012 to contact your employment counsel to review the plan and ensure your bases are covered.

    3. Rethink Your Hiring Practices

    The penalties for willfully misclassifying employees as independent contractors just went up.  This is an extremely high-risk area; so consult with knowledgeable counsel about your workforce status.

    Stop conducting financial background checks on applicants or employees until you speak with knowledgeable counsel regarding revisions to California’s privacy laws.  A new law limits which employers can conduct financial background checks and which employees can be the subject of such background checks.

    There are many more laws coming into effect in 2012. If you would like to receive a more detailed review of the changes, please send us an email at update@griegolaw.com with the subject line: “Send me the update.”

    The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego
    95 South Market Street, Suite 520
    San Jose, CA 95113
    Tel. 408-293-6341
     
    Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman, former associate of The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego.
     
    Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law, but we cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.
     
    Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be posted in this blog and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.Phillip J. Griego represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.

  • Inexpensive Sexual Harassment Training By The DFEH?

    The DFEH has been conducting no-cost sexual harassment prevention for state employers for the past year. It has now decided to offer the same training to private employers, purportedly at a low cost. The DFEH hasn’t specified what it means by “low-cost,” but it did indicate that the training will be available online.

    You can visit the DFEH’s website for more information. The press release should be available online in the next couple of days.

    The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego
    95 South Market Street, Suite 520
    San Jose, CA 95113
    Tel. 408-293-6341
     
    Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman, former associate of The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego.
     
    Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law, but we cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.
     
    Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be posted in this blog and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.Phillip J. Griego represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.

  • New Laws Regarding California Employers and Employees

    There are several new laws and amendments currently under consideration by the Governor of California, as well as the legislature.

    The Recorder reports that three bills, AB 267, AB 325, and AB 559, are currently sitting before the Governor Brown.

    • AB 267 prohibits “choice of law” or “forum selection” clauses in employment contracts if those clauses require the use of non-California law or litigation outside of California.
    • AB 325 would allow up to 3 days bereavement leave and would prohibit discrimination against employees who take time off for the  death of a spouse, child, parent, sibling, grandparent, grandchild, or domestic partner.  A successful plaintiff could recover back wages and attorneys’ fees.
    • AB 559 would modify a rule denounced by the California Supreme Court (Chavez v. City of Los Angeles, 47 Cal.4th 970) granting courts the authority to limit attorneys’ fees awards when the case could have been brought in limited jurisdiction as opposed to unlimited jurisdiction.

    The California Chamber of Commerce and other pro-employer entities oppose these bills, and in the past have successfully defeated similar bills while Schwarzenegger was in office.

    Governor Brown has already signed into law the following bills affecting employers and employees in California:

    • AB 240 Compensation recovery actions: liquidated damages.
    • AB 587 Public works: volunteers.
    • SB 117 Public contracts: prohibitions: discrimination based on gender or sexual orientation.
    • SB 374 Gambling control: key employee licenses.
    • SB 559  Discrimination: genetic information.
    • SB 609 Public Employment Relations Board: final orders.

    Of course we can’t forget about AB 889 regarding domestic workers, which I’ve discussed before.

    If you work or do business in California, especially if you do business on any public works projects, you should familiarize yourself with any new requirements applicable to your industry.

    The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego
    95 South Market Street, Suite 520
    San Jose, CA 95113
    Tel. 408-293-6341
     
    Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman, former associate of The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego.
     
    Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law, but we cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.
     
    Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be posted in this blog and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.Phillip J. Griego represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.

  • DFEH Announces Biggest Administrative Award Ever

    On September 12, 2011, the DFEH issued the following press release:

    State Department of Fair Employment and Housing Achieves Historic Victory
    Electrical Supply Company Ordered to Pay $846,300 for Firing Cancer Survivor

    ELK GROVE, CA – The California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) today announced its largest-ever administrative award of $846,300 against electrical supplier Acme Electric Corporation for firing an employee because he had cancer.  Headquartered in Lumberton, North Carolina, Acme Electric is a division of Actuant Corporation, a Wisconsin diversified industrial corporation that operates in more than 30 countries.

    “This historic administrative victory underscores the Department’s commitment to vindicating the rights of Californians victimized by workplace discrimination,” said DFEH Director Phyllis Cheng.

    Charles Richard Wideman worked for Acme Electric as western regional sales manager overseeing sales operations in the company’s largest territory from February 2004 to March 2008.   He developed kidney cancer in 2006 and prostate cancer in 2007.  Mr.  Wideman’s cancers required two surgeries and numerous cancer-related outpatient appointments.  The company immediately granted his two requests for time off for surgery and recuperative leave.  However, Mr. Wideman requested further accommodation for the travel limitation his cancers caused from June 2006 through April 2007.  Acme Electric refused to grant or even acknowledge these accommodation requests.  Instead, in December 2007, Mr. Wideman’s supervisor gave him an unfavorable performance evaluation, criticizing him for insufficient travel.  On February 28, 2008, ignoring Mr.  Wideman’s need for accommodation the preceding year and failing to take into account his dramatically improved job performance, Acme Electric fired Mr. Wideman, relying on the insufficient travel pretext.

    “California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) provides that persons with disabilities, such as cancer, must be reasonably accommodated, so that they can continue to work productively,” added Director Cheng.

    After a three-day hearing, the State’s Fair Employment and Housing Commission found Acme Electric violated the FEHA by failing to accommodate Mr. Wideman’s known travel limitation due to his cancers, failing to engage in a good faith interactive process, discriminating against Mr. Wideman because of his disability, and failing to take all reasonable steps necessary to prevent discrimination from occurring.  To compensate Mr. Wideman for his losses, the Commission awarded him $748,571 for lost wages, $22,729 for out-of-pocket expenses and $50,000 for the emotional distress he suffered.  In addition, the Commission ordered Acme to pay $25,000 to the State’s General Fund as an administrative fine.  Acme must further comply with posting, policy changes, and training requirements ordered by the Commission.

    Medical leaves are among the most complicated issues for employers and employees.  Several laws can impact the leave, the employer’s obligations and the employee’s rights.  Knowing how those laws interact will help you make informed decisions about leaves of absences, and hopefully avoid costly litigation.

    If you, or someone you know, has a question about a medical leave of absence, contact an attorney familiar with leave of absence laws.

    The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego
    95 South Market Street, Suite 520
    San Jose, CA 95113
    Tel. 408-293-6341
     
    Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman, former associate of The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego.
     
    Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law, but we cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.
     
    Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be posted in this blog and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.Phillip J. Griego represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.

    idual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship.

  • Leave Entitlements

    I was looking for some information regarding the various leave laws that employers must consider, and came across a guide from the Department of Fair Employment and Housing.  It is a fairly good summary of most of the various leave laws impacting companies doing business in California.  I noticed it does not discuss leaves of absence under USERRA and other available leaves under California’s Military and Veterans Code, but it is still a good summary.

    California employers and employees should ensure they are familiar with the various rights and obligations imposed by the leave laws impacting their work and should review their handbooks to ensure they are up to date.

    The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego
    95 South Market Street, Suite 520
    San Jose, CA 95113
    Tel. 408-293-6341
     
    Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman, former associate of The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego.
     
    Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law, but we cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.
     
    Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be posted in this blog and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.Phillip J. Griego represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.

  • Fair Employment and Housing Commission Is Being Eliminated

    Governor Jerry Brown issued the 2011/12 May Budget Revision (May Revise) in an attempt to reduce the  multi-billion dollar deficit.  As part of the revised budget the Governor eliminates and/or consolidatse many governmental programs.  Under the revised budget, the Fair Employment and Housing Commission (FEHC)—the civil rights agency with administrative adjudication and regulatory responsibility—will be eliminated effective January 1, 2012.  The Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH)—the remaining civil rights agency with intake, conciliation, mediation and prosecutorial responsibility—will continue to operate.

    What does this mean for employers and employees? While the DFEH can still receive, investigate and even prosecute claims of discrimination, the parties will no longer be able to pursue claims before the Fair Employment and Housing Commission.  Those that have litigated in both forums realize that the FEHC is oftentimes a lower-cost alternative to litigating discrimination cases.  While some feel that the FEHC was too employee-friendly, a review of published decisions indicate that the amounts awarded to successful claimants before the FEHC were oftentimes significantly lower than similar cases decided by a jury.

    Other actions put in place by the revised budget include:

    • Accelerate End of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Task Force
    • Eliminate    the    California    Privacy    Security    Advisory    Board
    • Eliminate the Health Care Quality Improvement and Cost Containment Commission
    • Eliminate    the    Colorado    River    Board
    • Eliminate    the    Salton    Sea    Council
    • Eliminate    the    State    Mining    and    Geology    Board
    • Eliminate Nine Advisory Committees and Review Panels at the Department of Fish and Game
    • Eliminate    the    Commission    on    Emergency    Medical    Services
    • Eliminate the California Health Policy and Data Advisory Commission (CHPDAC)
    • Eliminate    the    Healthcare    Workforce    Policy    Commission
    • Eliminate    the    Rural    Health    Policy    Council
    • Eliminate    the    Public    Health    Advisory    Committee    (PHAC)
    • Eliminate the California Medical Assistance Commission (CMAC)
    • Eliminate    the    Rehabilitation    Appeals    Board    (RAB)
    • Eliminate    the    Continuing    Care    Advisory    Committee    (CCAC)
    • Eliminate the Office of the Insurance Advisor (OIA) within the State and Consumer Services Agency
    • Eliminate the Office of Gang and Youth Violence Prevention
    • Eliminate    California    Emergency    Council    (CEC)
    • Eliminate    the    California    Law    Revision    Commission
    • Eliminate    the    Commission    on    Uniform    State    Laws
    • Eliminate the Office of Privacy Protection within the State and Consumer Services Agency
    • Eliminate    the    Unemployment    Insurance    Appeals    Board
    • Eliminate the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Standards Board
    • Reduce the Labor and Workforce Development Agency
    • Eliminate    Child    Care    Monitoring    Support
    • Transfer Support of the Governor’s Commission on Employment of People with Disabilities to the Department of Rehabilitation
    •  The    Office    of    Secretary    of    Education    has been eliminated
    • The    Inspector    General    for    the    American    Recovery    and Reinvestment Act has been eliminated
    • No travel by state employees is permitted unless mission critical

    In total, the proposals in the revised budget are supposed to save $82.7 million ($41.5 million General Fund).

    You can download a copy of the state agencies that are slated to be eliminated or reduced

    You can also download the entire Revised Budget Plan.

    The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego
    95 South Market Street, Suite 520
    San Jose, CA 95113
    Tel. 408-293-6341
     
    Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman, former associate of The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego.
     
    Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law, but we cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.
     
    Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be posted in this blog and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.
    Phillip J. Griego represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.

  • ADAAA Recap

    More than two years ago President Bush signed into law the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA), which took effect in 2010.  The purpose of the law was to overturn a series of decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court under the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and effectively expanded the scope of what constitutes a “disability” under Federal law.  Many believed the amendments overly broadened the statute, while others argued the amendments merely clarified the original intent of the law that the courts had neglected.

    The law did not significantly change the requirements for California employers because California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) already defined “disability” more broadly than the ADA.

    Some of the major changes added by the ADAAA include:

    • Clarifying that the ADA should be interpreted in favor of “broad coverage of individuals . . . to the maximum extent permitted” by the statute.
    • The addition of other examples of “major life activities” such as caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, seeing, hearing, eating, sleeping, walking, standing, lifting, bending, speaking, breathing, learning, reading, concentrating, thinking, communicating, and working.
    • Clarifying that employees who are “regarded as” disabled, but are not actually disabled, are not entitled to reasonable accommodations.
    • Modifying the “regarded as” prong of the definition of disability to not apply to conditions that are “transitory” (actual or expected duration of less than 6 months) or “minor.”
    • Requiring the determination of whether an impairment substantially limits a major life activity to be made without regard to the use of mitigating measures (in other words, if the person did not take his/her medication would the individual’s medical condition substantially impair one or more life functions.

    Despite the concerns expressed when the bill was passed, I have not seen a significant increase in the number of ADA cases brought to court.  I don’t know if it is just too early to tell, or I just don’t see the difference because the requirements on California employees and employers have not drastically changed.  Although I have not seen a significant rise in disability discrimination cases, it is still a frequently misapplied area.  I probably receive more phone calls about appropriate accommodations than any other area of law, with the possible exception of wage and hour questions.  If you have a question about disability discrimination or reasonable accommodations, speak with a lawyer familiar with the employment laws before the issue becomes a problem.

    The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego
    95 South Market Street, Suite 520
    San Jose, CA 95113
    Tel. 408-293-6341
     
    Original article by Robert E. Nuddleman, former associate of The Law Office of Phillip J. Griego.
     

    Feel free to suggest topics for the blog. We are happy to consider topics pertaining to general points of Labor and Employment Law, but we cannot answer questions about specific situations or provide legal advice. If you desire legal advice, you should contact an attorney.

    Your use of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego. The use of the Internet or this blog for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be posted in this blog and the Law Office of Phillip J. Griego cannot guarantee the confidentiality of anything posted to this blog.

    Phillip J. Griego represents employees and businesses throughout Silicon Valley and the greater San Francisco Bay Area including Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Mountain View, Los Altos, San Jose, the South Bay Area, Campbell, Los Gatos, Cupertino, Morgan Hill, Gilroy, Sunnyvale, Santa Cruz, Saratoga, and Alameda, San Mateo, Santa Clara, San Benito, Mendocino, and Calaveras counties.